Saturday, June 24, 2017

Kitsch and Kulture: Transition in South Florida Culture 1960-1990 at the Box Gallery

Photo by David Godlis

The Box Gallery
811 Belvedere Road
West Palm Beach, Florida 33405


Accept our invitation to attend the
Kitsch and Kulture
Transition in South Florida Culture 1960-1990 

July 15, 2017 through August 30, 2017
at
The Box Gallery
811 Belvedere Road, West Palm Beach, Florida 33405

Curators: Rolando Chang Barrero and Sandra Schulman

Kitsch and Kulture at The Box Gallery, located at 811 Belvedere Road, West Palm Beach, Florida, explores three decades of work by four exceptional artists that have left an indelible visual account of South Florida’s Kitsch Kulture of the 60-90’s era . The exhibition, co-curated by Rolando Chang Barrero and Sandra Schulman, opens with a reception on Saturday, July 15, 2017 at 7 PM and continues through August 30th, 2017.


West Palm Beach—While Odd Nerdrum’s manifesto on September 24, 1998 contextualized the Kitsch movement by declaring himself a “kitsch painter,” the diatribe between low and high art is still contentious at best. Although Kitsch art has since become recognized as a style and movement in the arts, it is still largely considered low-brow among many intellectuals  seen primarily through a sentimental pane of melancholia created by the non-traditional artist. Ironically South Florida, which is currently at the top of the international fine art scene for quite some time now, has served as the bulwark of kitsch art and its accompanying culture for more than 25 years. 
Kitsch and Kulture at The Box Gallery explores three decades of work by four exceptional artists that have left an indelible visual account of South Florida’s Kitsch Kulture of the 60-90’s era
David Godlis
New York photographer David Godlis champions the life of the leopard print fake fur-clad society… the under belly of the world known as the art-deco-dent days of South Florida. His recent book, “History is Made at Night,” documents the raucous New York punk nightlife at the CBGB club in the 1970’s.


Selections from his book “We are Everywhere and We Shall Be Free” have been cited by Carl Hiaasen of the Miami Herald as “cool photographs that are a wild, free-falling flashback to South Florida in the late ’70s and early ’80s. To those who weren't there — and don't believe what they've heard — this book is proof that it wasn't fantasy. It was real.”

“I’ve never gone out with a picture already in my head — the real world of Miami is stranger than anything I could think of,” explains Hashim.

Carlos Alves
Alves kick-started his post-college career with a free flowing ceramic tile installation located on the floor and walls of South Beach’s Art Center South Florida. The project eventually led to commissions by a number of public and private clients in the US, and from London to Hong Kong. Alves’ use of custom handmade blue bananas mingled with souvenir ceramics of flamingos, Florida gators, art-deco memorabilia, and vintage Fiestaware, all transformed kitschy objects of South Florida’s Weeki Wachee days into grand installations at the private homes of the rich and famous and fine art collectors worldwide.

Dina Knapp
The recently decease
d Dina Knapp introduced fine art as wearable art to the couture class and catapulted a trend that continues today. Knapp’s life was spent weaving craft, kitsch, poetry, and history into three-dimensional works of art riddled with humor, truth, and the essence of life on South Beach.

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